Friday, March 15, 2013

Testing Wine Soap

I decided to try my attempt at wine soap.  I live in the Okanagan Valley in beautiful British Columbia, Canada.  We are considered a desert and we have numerous wineries that produced some top quality wines.  I wanted to test Red Wine, Rose Wine and White Wine for the colour and smell.  I have smelled other wine soaps that have added scent to them, but for this experiment, I wanted to keep it completely natural.



I decided to try several different options with each type of wine.  The first was  letting the soap sit on the counter in the mold, the second was putting the soap in the freezer and the third was Cold Process Oven Process (CPOP).  

I also wanted to see what the differences were with different amounts of wine, and when the wine was added.  In one batch I added 100% of the wine in place of the water.    In another batch I did a 50/50 ratio with 50% wine and 50% water.  The third batch was 50/50 again but I added the wine at trace this time (for this experiment I will refer to this as "added at trace").  Here are the results:


White Wine:
The whitest of the White Wine soap turned out to be pretty much the same, however, the lightest one was when the White Wine was added at trace and put in the freezer.  The darkest one was when the White Wine was added at 100% and CPOP.  Interesting observation though was the 100% wine that was on the counter and freezer both developed ash but the CPOP did not.  Ash also developed on the 50/50 mixture on the freezer and CPOP method.  And as for the wine that was added at trace, ash was only slightly detected on the freezer and CPOP method.



Rose Wine:
The lightest was a combination of the 50/50 mixture for the counter, freezer and CPOP method and when the Rose Wine was added at trace for the counter and freezer methods.  The darkest one was when the Rose Wine was at 100% and CPOP.  I developed ash with the 100% mixture with the counter and freezer method, but not CPOP.  There was a tiny bit of ash on the 50/50 mixture for the counter and freezer method and a bit more on the CPOP.  For the Rose Wine that was added at trace, the ash only showed up on the counter method.



Red Wine:
The lightest was 50/50 mixture for the counter and CPOP method and the freezer method was slightly darker.  The darkest was when the Red Wine was added at 100%, with it being a medium brown colour.  The second darkest was when the Red Wine was added at trace and using the CPOP method.  I had ash when the Red Wine was used at 100% for the counter and freezer method, but not for CPOP method.  I received quite a lot of ash when the Red Wine was the 50/50 mixture in all three methods.  Funny enough, the only ash I had when the Red Wine was added at trace was only a little bit from the freezer method.



Conclusion:
I was disappointed that the Wine smell didn't come through the soap at all but I was also expecting this to happen.  I was also bummed that the colour didn't keep.  I am not sure if different varieties of Wine would help or not.  If I am to make Wine soap again in the future, I will add colour and scent.  I also suspect that making Wine soap with the Hot Process (HP) method might also help to retain some of the natural colours, however, I have never made HP soap before so it is only a guess.

If any of you soapers make wine soap, I would love to hear your tips and tricks.

3 comments:

  1. What a great post! Thanks for sharing your different tests and the ways you made the soap. What a super helpful guide for anyone who is wanting to use wine in their soaps. =)

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  2. Hello, and thank you for the great informative post!! I love posts when people share detailed info about their experimenting! I don't get very interesting colours in my wine soap unless I add clay, but I am more interested in the performance of your bars. How did they perform? Did they harden well? How was the lather? Did you use a water discount? When you did 100% wine, did you simply mix the lye with the wine directly? Or did you do anything to the wine first? xoxo Jen

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    1. Hi Jennifer, thanks for your comment. I haven't actually done the performance tests yet so stay turned for another post about that. They did harden - I could unmold them after 24 hours. I used a 7% water discount. When I did the 100% wine, I froze it first and then added the lye very slowly. I did boil all 3 wines first and then let them cool (or froze).

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